Follow. There are 6,128 graphic design works online. Yusaku KamekuraPaul Rand: His Work from 1946 to 1958Japan, 1959printed paper10.25 w × 10 h in (26 × 25 cm)Signed and inscribed to interior page: [For Marion San with love Paul-San 5/26/59].Literature: A Designer's Art, Rand, pg. Kamekura a First published in 1975, the slim paperback is the result of an offbeat collecting quest done by Japanese designer Yusaku Kamekura (1915-1997). When he designed the famous Hiroshima Appeals poster of 1983, Kamekura explained his thought process behind the peace poster: “skeletons and nuclear mushroom clouds are beautiful and frightening. Some of these works include the logo for Taiyo Kikai-Kogyo Machine Factory (1943), Daishowa Seishi Paper Mill (1966), as well as the Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Company (1952). Artworks. He worked for a joint advertising office headed by Hideshige Ota for several months this year. Those trademarks helped shape the corporate images and direction, and many of them were still used by the companies today. Once when he visited New York for the International Design Conference, he recalled a story of him brought home the boxes decorated with abstract design that Americans soldiers left at the station right after the war. Here is a collection of posters by the father of Japanese graphic design, Yusaku Kamekura. As he displayed those boxes on the shelf, he felt “as though a fresh air of civilization and culture was suddenly filling my room. “Kamekura was thrilled with the world,” said Ikko Tanaka. Born in 1915, Yusaku Kamekura grew up in Niigata Prefecture, northwest of Tokyo on the Sea of Japan. W/ publisher's original glassine over jacket & cardboard slipcase. He is probably best-known for his 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games posters as Japan was still culturally shaken from the aftermath of the WWII, and Kamekura was tasked with creating a successful poster campaign to propel his country into the post-war design elite. The typography takes a backseat to most of the poster, which is a common trend with most of Yusaku Kamekura’s works. His use of color, while minimal, was bright and imaginative, especially when paired with his use of black backgrounds to bring out most of the color and the texture. Kamekura valued fair-play, and recognized the talent in a young designers at first glance. He spent five years collecting 700 logos from across the world for his book Trademarks of the World, which was a standard book for the period published in 1956. by Yusaku Kamekura (Editor) 5.0 out of 5 stars 3 ratings. Yusaku Kamekura has 19 works online. Two years after his first one-man show, he organized the famed Graphic '55 exhibition at the Takashimaya department store, introducing design into the vocabulary of the populace. Text by Yusaku Kamekura, 1962 Design 11 No. 132 pp. Kamekura had a brief stint as a logo and corporate branding designer following his time with Nikon. 132 pp. Title Personal Work Client Personal Work. Devising the look of Tokyo ’64 fell to Yusaku Kamekura, the dean of Japanese graphic designers, who had imbibed modern design from the Bauhaus-trained professors of … Some of the covers would use photographs to emphasize certain aspects of the 2-D design, which Kamekura would use a lot more in the following decade. 1959. He is probably best-known for his 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games posters as Japan was still culturally shaken from the aftermath of the WWII, and Kamekura was tasked with creating a successful poster campaign to propel his country into the post-war design elite. But the President of the Japan Graphic Designers Association, Inc. (JAGDA) Yusaku Kamekura has accomplished this … This is one of many other reasons Kamekura was portrayed as the “father of Japanese graphic design.” He set out to introduce these concepts to the Japanese people, but he also went out of his way to create opportunities for more Japanese designers to emerge onto the quickly growing field. (Yusaku Kamekura: His Works. Page 1 of 1. The text, especially prepared for a Western audience, invites the attention of all those interested in Japanese culture. Living in this post-war age, Kamekura regarded the western culture as civilization and freshness. Tokyo: Bijutsu Shuppan-Sha, 1971. Japan’s economy was focused very heavily on exports and people are more inclined to purchase things with good design. Kamekura went on to establish the Japanese Advertising Artist’s Club (JAAC) in 1951. This effort to bridge the gap between western and eastern design trends came following the Japanese defeat in WWII in 1945, which led to the Japanese combining and incorporating many western trends and influences into their society. Since 1989, Kamekura has been the editor, cover designer, and organizer of Creation Magazine, a series of publications limited to twenty issues which focus on international graphic design, art, and illustration work by a variety of artists. From 1978 to 1984, he devoted himself to the organization’s expansion, improvement and legal incorporation. There are 10,231 design works online. Yusaku Kamekura (1915-1997) was one of Japan’s most prolific graphic designers. True. When he was seventeen, he took his first assignment when he designed the Japanese edition of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s Night Flight, and he knew that he wanted to become a graphic designer. It is no secret that Rand was a great admirer of Japanese design and would regularly remind his students that the Japanese were, in his mind, entirely unparalleled in the field. Here, he learned much more about constructivism and Bauhaus directly and various methods of incorporating traditional Japanese themes into this distinctly western art style. PAUL RAND: HIS WORK FROM 1946 TO 1958 Yusaku Kamekura [Editor] Yusaku Kamekura [Editor]: PAUL RAND: HIS WORK FROM 1946 TO 1958. This issue includes a feature on boat interior design and modernist furniture. He was outspoken, blunt, and straightforward, just as his work which always had a style of boldness, clarity and directness. Kamekura’s forms and designs during this period continued to reflect his abstract take on design. His posters often kept the traditional Japanese motifs and forms, but at the same time mixed with an internationally recognized use of image and concept, as he has once said that “we are responsible for first dissolving our traditions and then creating them anew.” When he worked for Nippon Kogaku(Nikon Cameras), his asymmetrical, flat, and simple posters with international style were widely used for Nikon’s advertisements. Kamekura was born into a world at war, right in the middle of WWI. People in Japan began to shift their emphasis from traditional fine art to applied art like graphic design. “Kamekura, Yusaku: YUSAKU KAMEKURA: HIS WORKS. by Yusaku Kamekura (Editor) 5.0 out of 5 stars 3 ratings. Uncompromising perfectionist, visionary and the profession's first undisputed leader, Yusaku Kamekura worked all his life to shape it. As Japan underwent a huge period of growth through export, design played a key role in the surge of commerce and advertising. Consign with Artsy. 40 1/2x28 1/2 inches, 103x72 1/2 cm. Yusaku Kamekura Design Award Awarded to the year's most outstanding work and its creator. When world war II ended in 1945, Japan’s crushing defeat brought millions of its citizens to the brink of starvation, suffering, and labor unrest. Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in a new window or tab Share on Twitter - opens in a new window or tab Share on Pinterest - opens in a new window or tab Yusaku Kamekura’s design for the Olympic poster conveyed Tokyo’s ambitions: the five interlocking rings, topped by a huge red disc, the rising sun. After the war, Kamekura began his professional design career and moved into the field of corporate symbols and posters. Bio Japanese, 1915–1997. Yale University, Council on East Asian Studies, 2011, elischolar.library.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=1002&context=ceas_publication_series. Yusaku Kamekura, … Condition A-: creases and minor tears at edges; minor creases in image. Green cloth stamped in pink. As design was essential in supporting the expansion of commercial market, Kamekura also pursued the path of trademark, signs, and corporate symbols. Kamekura had always been seeking for new ideas and new materials in design, like what he once said “design lives for its freshness.”, Explain By Example: Designing Production Systems, Design System for dummies, create your own flavor of React Native app in 3 easy steps, AMA with Alissa Briggs, Director of Design, Trailblazing Architects Inspire Future Design Leaders, Designing for wellbeing in times of change. In 1950s, he visited designers in Kensai region of Japan and brought their work to the attention of Tokyo designers. His work was seen as contemporary as it was being designed around trends that, not only were big at the time but also simplistic in nature with minimal uses of color. The Tokyo Olympic symbol is a powerful, concise design, while the posters capture the dynamism of athletes. “Company | TAIYO MACHINERY Co.,Ltd.” 日本語, www.taiyokikai.com/en/company/. 12 1959 Japanse tekst Kamekura, Yusaku Graphics. At this point, he was now an international designer that was not only pushing the Japanese ideals of graphic design but creating them. Yusaku Kamekura, born April 16, 1915, was a prominent designer of the post-war period. How I stumbled across a niche hobby I never knew existed: Drawing (and animating) in CSS. Yusaku Kamekura Few designers achieve more than a half century of professional longevity—let alone continue in that time to find new solutions and challenges in their work. After this project, Kamekura would continue his career focusing mostly on poster design. Square quarto. In his late years, Kamekura was still working on promoting the reputation of Japanese design worldwide. This project was an essential metaphor for the combination of western design trends with styles and symbols of the Japanese aesthetic. They were simple, yet powerful and clean-cut. He worked for a joint advertising office headed by Hideshige Ota for several months this year. Yusaku Kamekura. Paper. His work would go to not only define Japan’s post-war, but also the general aesthetic as well as the ideals of the time. following. Cart 3. While Kamekura was successfully expanding his personal design career, he had always been trying to consolidate the role of graphic design in Japan and cultivate more talented young designers in the community. The Olympics in East Asia: Nationalism, Regionalism, and Globalism on the Center Stage of World Sports. He has chosen friends who are the formost figures in their professional fields such as Sofu Teshigahara, who was the flower arrangement master, and Ken Domon, who was the leading photographer in Japan. Personal Work. Yusaku Kamekura graphic design exhibition, International Design Center Nagoya by Yūsaku Kamekura ... a work of genuine scholarship, and a visual delight. The simple geometry of the cherry blossom in the middle is easily recognizable and further brought out when pair 120 This was done to further push his ideas onto the Japanese design scene and later the world, seeing as he, “thought that it would make the Hinomaru [modern Japanese flag] look like a modern design” (Kelly 45, Kamekura 1966). Graduated from Nihon University Junior High School in 1933. Kamekura’s work on the Osaka expo poster was, in my opinion, one of his best performances that exemplified his efforts to unify the aesthetic themes of Bauhaus and Constructivism with Japanese ideals and traditions. Free shipping for many products! The simple phrase “Tokyo 1964” combined with the Olympic rings and the red sun from the Japanese flag demonstrated his blending of western modern design approach and the Japanese cultural aesthetic. His designs find a synthesis between the rational, logical and functional creative systems of the west and the classical grace of traditional Japanese design. In 1962, he set up his own practice and established Kamekura Design Office. Alongside these advertisements, he worked on the team behind Nippon Camera magazine, which was a photography magazine that took traditional Japanese symbols and forms and blended them with the design trends of the time. Yusaku Kamekura, born April 16, 1915, was a prominent designer of the post-war period. Hehad founded multiple design organizations, introduced modern design styles into Japanese traditional art, and inspired a great number of famous designers in the post war age including Ikko Tanaka and Kazumasa Nagai. The year’s most outstanding work is selected from all designs included in the yearbook, regardless of the designer’s age or career background. 40 is an out-of-print and rare issue of a slim 54pp Japanese magazine from the 60s dedicated to all things design. Personal Work. Those early-life experience heavily influenced Kamekura with European western modern innovation in design: Bauhaus, Constructivism, Paul Rand, and the Art Deco posters of A.M. Cassandre. Sofu Teshigahara, One Man Show, 1954 []. Yusaku Kamekura, born in 1915, played an important role in shaping the modern graphic design of J apan. Kamekura sought to bring Japanese graphic design to the international scene with his unique blend of Bauhaus-influenced design mixed with traditional Japanese themes and aesthetics. Bio Japanese, 1915–1997. Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in a new window or tab Share on Twitter - opens in a new window or tab Share on Pinterest - opens in a new window or tab This might be because of his goal of bridging the … The period was the “revival” of Japan as an economic power and Kamekura set out to demonstrate this globalization with the use of constructivist style designs with this branding. Bijutsu Shuppan-sha, 1971.) Kelly, William W., and Susan Brownell. yusaku kamekura In tribute to graphic designer Yusaku Kamekura who passed away suddenly in 1997, a prize in his name was established in 1999 as a contribution to the development of the graphic design industry. Also, in 1993, he was inducted into the Tokyo and New York Art Directors Club (ADC). 40 is an out-of-print and rare issue of a slim 54pp Japanese magazine from the 60s dedicated to all things design. Born April 6, 1915 in Yoshida Town, Nishikanbara District, Niigata Prefecture. Yusaku Kamekura was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan in 1915. following. He combined international style of design and traditional Japanese art, and had created posters, corporate symbols, trademarks, and book covers that were still world-known today. On the contrast, the trademarks in Japan only followed the fashion but were not able to become classic and everlasting. He would often incorporate photography into his work to contrast against his simple geometric forms and layouts. “He taught me how to see.” As the godfather of Japanese graphic art, he had inspired a lot of well-known designers such as Ikko Tanaka, Kazumasa Nagai, Akira Uno, Tadanori Yokko, Toshihiro Katayama, Tsunehisa Kimura, Seiji Shirai, and Kuniomi Uematsu.